Burrard Marina Fieldhouse residency, ‘23 Days at Sea’, Vancouver, 2016. Photo by Kara Dherouf.

Burrard Marina Fieldhouse residency, ‘23 Days at Sea’, Vancouver, 2016. Photo by Kara Dherouf.

Amaara Raheem is of multiple belongings, and currently based in Melbourne. As an independent dance-artist she is most interested in collaborating with practitioners from other fields to make transdisciplinary, site-responsive work. Amaara’s work takes multiple modes including live events, video installation, sound/song and text. Her work has been shown in Australia, New Zealand, Macau, Sri Lanka, Canada and throughout Europe in partnerships with organisations such as Dancehouse, Chisenhale Dance Space, Independent Dance, The Performance Arcade, Access Gallery, Institute of Modern Art, Critical Path, Colombo Dance Platform, Theatrum Mundi, Ovalhouse, and Carriageworks. She is currently undertaking a practice-based PhD at School of Architecture & Design, RMIT University.

Amaara has been the recipient of several commissions including Diversity '13 (Ovalhouse, London, 2013), 23 Days at Sea (Access Gallery, Vancouver, 2016), and Responsive Residency (Critical Path, Sydney, 2017). In 2018 Amaara is artist in-residence at Cecil St Studios, Fitzroy where she acts as artist-archivist at this particular time in its history. After 21 years as a ‘home’ for improvised performance, Cecil St will be demolished in 2019, for apartments. Amaara is building an ephemeral archive of this significant creative space in Melbourne.

Alongside her choreographic practice she performs nationally and internationally for/with artists such as Rhiannon Newton, Tino Seghal, Florence Peake, Caitlin Franzmann, Caroline Bergvall, Goldin+Senneby, Camila Marambio, and Mick Douglas amongst others. Since 2015 Amaara has ongoingly performed in Xavier Le Roy's Temporary Title, 2015  first in its premiere at Carriageworks (Sydney, 2015), Centre Pompidou (Paris, 2016), Tanzplattform (Essen, 2018), Haus der Kultur der Welt (2019).

In January 2019 Amaara will be presenting a new site-based work in Colombo, Sri Lanka called, TUG. This work is part video, part live performance commissioned by the Australian Embassy and multidisciplinary art festival, Colomboscope. It consists of a video-work in a Werribee wetland exploring the flight pathways of Australian migratory birds; building a choreography inspired by birds’ biological desires and instinctual navigational capabilities. The video and the live performance act in tandem producing an internal/external relation to wetland; working with thresholds where a human-bird body, with its own migratory tugs, can flutter, nest, hover.